CW’s “The Flash” packed a lot of twisting plot lines and dangerous secrets into nine episodes. Barry’s (Grant Gustin) childhood was devastated by an unexplained mystery, and his life got more complicated from there. Each week the heroes and villains, the scientific uncertainties, and romantic entanglements leave viewers desperate for more details. The explosive midseason finale added even more burning questions to the ones we’ve been harboring since day one.

Will Caitlin’s boyfriend remain a good guy?

You might be wondering how Ronnie (Robbie Amell) has such long, grunge-band hair when his head frequently explodes into flames. The ultimate burning question, however, is if Firestorm will manage to be a metahuman who doesn’t go on a crazy killing spree. He ominously warns Caitlin (Danielle Panabaker) not to pursue him, possibly just to save her from third-degree burns. Ronnie did show up in time to save Barry from another Reverse Flash beat down. This puts him solidly in the good guy column for now.

What else will The Flash be able to do?

In the first episodes of “The Flash,” viewers were introduced to a guy who could run fast. As the character has evolved, we’ve seen Barry get potential victims out of the way of speeding bullets. A search through 3000 paper files for a single clue is completed in the blink of an eye. He can beat up bad guys, literally before they know what hit them.

Dr. Wells (Tom Cavanagh) was practically salivating over the tachyons and their ability to make Reverse Flash invincible. We’re guessing he’s not going to stop until Barry’s full potential is reached. He probably won’t stop even if his experimentation goes beyond what Barry is capable of. What will unfathomable speed do for The Flash? Will he be able to circle the earth and reverse time like the ’70s movie Superman did? We need the good doctor’s future room to know for sure.

How do the metahumans in prison survive?

Similar to artifacts on “Warehouse 13,” dangerous entities get boxed up in the supermax basement of S.T.A.R. Labs. The cells are small, and don’t look furnished at all. While some metahumans have lost basic human biological characteristics, we wonder how they live in these conditions. How do they eat or go to the bathroom? How do they avoid deeper insanity when alone with no Internet access?

The impregnable nature of the cells makes it difficult to imagine Cisco (Carlos Valdes) sliding a tray of food through a slot in the door. Social time out in the yard, including weightlifting and bargaining for cigarettes, is also implausible. We’ll just have to grant suspension of disbelief to this comic book fiction.

Why is Iris dating a Ken doll?

We’re supposed to like Barry better, but it helps the drama if the competition is real. The problem is that Iris (Candice Patton) has zero chemistry with pretty boy Eddie (Rick Cosnett). In fact, Eddie has more chemistry with Barry, which would make this a really complicated love triangle on a show like “Nashville.”

In the world of “The Flash,” though, it’s like Iris got set up with “a nice boy” by a meddling aunt. Iris and Eddie have a polite relationship where they use all the right romantic keywords in conversation. The writers never help us understand why they’re together. Iris is bubbly and passionate and, bad Christmas gift for Barry aside, a caring person. We don’t know what she sees in a stuffy, unsupportive Ken doll.

How was Reverse Flash created?

Dr. Wells insisted a super-speedy entity could not have killed Barry’s mother, because her death was well before the particle accelerator explosion. Joe (Jesse L. Martin) was suspicious about the timing of Dr. Wells’ arrival in Central City, and viewers know the genius scientist has a lot of dark secrets. If super speed creates the potential for time travel, Wells might be telling the truth. Reverse Flash could be a nemesis from Barry’s future.

The midseason finale twist has many thinking it’s Wells himself. This means we’re definitely not in the “Doctor Who” universe where crossing your own timeline has cataclysmic results. It would explain Wells’ glee at the end of the episode. What better way to shield your identity than by beating yourself up in front of witnesses? Did present-day Wells know he was going to get beaten up? Why was Eddie spared? These are the mind-warping follow-up questions that make comic fans go crazy, and start flame wars online.

What burning questions do you have about “The Flash”? Are you more concerned about villains and time travel or that Barry never gave Felicity a chance?

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