SVG Icons

Your State’s Most Beloved Pixar Movie in 2019

A generation has grown up with Pixar, starting with Toy Story way back in 1995. Now that Toy Story 4 is upon us, it’s safe to assume that Buzz Lightyear wasn’t kidding about taking it “To infinity . . . and beyond!”

In anticipation of the June 21 release of Toy Story 4, we toyed around with Google Trends to determine the most popular Pixar movie in each state. Let’s see what everyone ages three and up has been searching for in the Pixar world this year.

Big ups for Up

In a dramatic ascendance over last year, 2009’s Up is a favorite in 17 states. The tale of octogenarian Carl and his flying house (and, of course, Dug the dog) claimed only a couple of states last year but ballooned by nearly 750% in 2019. Ellie would be proud.

Up-worthy states:

  • Alabama
  • District of Columbia
  • Georgia
  • Illinois
  • Maryland
  • Michigan
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Oklahoma
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin

Feeling Brave

Trailing behind Up with the love of eight states is 2012’s Brave, followed by 2015’s Inside Out with five.

Brave’s flame-haired Scottish Princess Merida sparked the interest of Colorado, Maine, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Washington. Meanwhile, Inside Out’s colorful crew of emotions felt the feels from Indiana, Nebraska, Ohio, Oregon, and Utah.

The toy stories

The original 1995 Toy Story is still a favorite with Florida, but Idaho prefers 1999’s Toy Story 2. Meanwhile, Connecticut, Delaware, and Nevada like 2010’s Toy Story 3, wherein teenaged Andy heads off to college and his toys are inadvertently sent to the trash. In our opinion, TS3’s harrowing incinerator scene alone qualifies it as the Empire Strikes Back of the franchise.

One-state wonders

Several Pixar flicks scored just a single state: 1998’s A Bug’s Life (Louisiana), 2011’s Cars 2 (Arkansas), 2017’s Cars 3 (Kentucky), 2003’s Finding Nemo (Hawaii), 2015’s The Good Dinosaur (Wyoming), and 2008’s WALL-E (Alaska). Of them all, only Hawaii stood by their 2018 favorite.

An Incredibles slight

The Incredibles (2004) lived up to its name, but last year’s Incredibles 2? Not so much.

California and Texas love the original outing of the fantastical superhero family, but 2018 sequel Incredibles 2 couldn’t even register interest in Municiberg (state unknown). Newness is probably a factor here; maybe Incredibles 2 will show up next year.

Dory (still) rules

Iowa, Kansas, Montana, and Rhode Island won’t give up on fish tale Finding Dory, the 2016 sequel to Finding Nemo that went on to become the third-most successful Pixar movie of all time (sorry, Nemo).

In fact, billion-dollar Dory swims behind Toy Story 2 (Pixar’s top earner) and Incredibles 2 in overall box-office receipts.

Of monsters and rats

What do Monsters, Inc. (2001) and Ratatouille (2007) have in common? Besides both scoring a Rotten Tomatoes rating of 96%, they’re also loved in two states apiece.

Monsters, Inc. scared up sympathy from Arizona and New Mexico, while Ratatouille fricasseed feelings in Massachusetts and Vermont.

MIA in the USA

Unfortunately, three Pixar movies from CableTV.com’s 2018 popular Pixar movies list didn’t make the cut this year: Cars (2006), Monsters University (2013), and Coco (2017). We can understand Cars, since it—and its sequels—aren’t exactly critical darlings. But Monsters University and especially the charming Coco? Here’s hoping for a 2020 comeback for both.

What do you think about the most popular Pixar movie in your state this year? Does it match up with your own? Do you want justice for Coco? Let us know in the comments below.

About the Author

Bill Frost has been a journalist and TV reviewer since the 4:3-aspect-ratio ’90s. His pulse-pounding prose has been featured in The Salt Lake Tribune, Pacific Northwest Inlander, Las Vegas Weekly, and many other dead-tree publications. In addition to his CableTV.com work, Bill is currently a senior writer and streaming TV columnist at SLUGMag.com. By night, Bill cranks a Flying V with his band at the bar.

This site is a U.S. Consumer site. You can learn more about our site and privacy policy here.

Share This